Ostara Eggs
We expanded our egg dye repertoire to 4 colors this year: yellow onion skin for that deep, complex rust-tea color; red cabbage for purple; beets for red; and blueberry for blue. Maybe everyone knows this (the grandparents’ eye rolling indicated this was the case), but I didn’t, so I’ll pass this tip on: hard boil the eggs prior to working with them! We lost several on the floor to the exuberant toddlers trying to do everything at once.
Servings Prep Time
4dozen eggs 30minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
2 hours 1-12hours
Servings Prep Time
4dozen eggs 30minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
2 hours 1-12hours
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. In each of four big soup pots place the plant material, water to fill the pot, and about 1/4 cup vinegar (it helps bond the color). I let them simmer for about two hours before we started any dying.
  2. Prep the stockings: the toe-end pieces are fine (they already have a closed end), but the “tube” pieces need to be tied off. Just make a knot at one end of each of them with enough room for the egg and a second knot to close it.
  3. Now you’re ready! Grab an egg, one stocking “sack”, and a flower or leaf of your choice. Wet the egg. Place the flower on the egg (the water will help it stay in place). Put your hand inside the sack so that you can hold the egg and flower firmly through the stocking material, and then unfold the stocking over so that the egg is inside the sack. Tie a knot in the open end as tightly as you can (this holds the flower closely onto the egg and makes a clearer image on the finished product).
  4. Place the egg sack into the color of your choice! The longer you leave the egg in the dye, the deeper and more complex the color will be; most of these were dyed for just one hour but the darkest were left in the pot for about 4 hours.
  5. With all the children involved, this made a spectacular mess of my stovetop! But I found the splatter patterns quite beautiful and took several artsy pictures of them before the inevitable deep clean-up.
Recipe Notes

*Make sure to tie the stocking sacks tightly! The blue egg in the carton with the clear flower print was tightly placed, while most of the rest in the carton were tied loosely.
*The longer you leave the eggs in the dye the more vibrant they will be. The dark blue and rust ones were left in for about 4 hours while others were only dyed for 1 hour .
*The onion skin dye and blueberry dye were the most effective for us (though time was likely a factor; let me know how your eggs turn out in the comments!).